No Family History and no Dense Breasts

Knowledge is power when it comes to your breast health.

Screening for breast cancer is your choice and should be based on your own personal values. It is recommended that you have a discussion with your primary care provider about: your genetic risk,  lifestyle, and personal health history. 75% of women who develop breast cancer have no family history of breast cancer and no risk factors other than being women. A decision about your breast health includes a look at the benefits and limitations of mammograms.

25-39 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

40-49 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

50-74 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

75+ years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

Breast Cancer Screening in British Columbia

Knowledge is power when it comes to your breast health.

Screening for breast cancer is your choice and should be based on your own personal values. It is recommended that you have a discussion with your primary care provider about: your genetic risk,  lifestyle, and personal health history. 75% of women who develop breast cancer have no family history of breast cancer and no risk factors other than being women. A decision about your breast health includes a look at the benefits and limitations of mammograms.

25-39 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

40-49 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

50-74 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

75+ years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

Breast Cancer Screening in British Columbia

Knowledge is power when it comes to your breast health.

Screening for breast cancer is your choice and should be based on your own personal values. It is recommended that you have a discussion with your primary care provider about: your genetic risk,  lifestyle, and personal health history. 75% of women who develop breast cancer have no family history of breast cancer and no risk factors other than being women. A decision about your breast health includes a look at the benefits and limitations of mammograms.

25-39 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

40-49 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

50-74 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

75+ years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

Breast Cancer Screening in British Columbia

Knowledge is power when it comes to your breast health.

Screening for breast cancer is your choice and should be based on your own personal values. It is recommended that you have a discussion with your primary care provider about: your genetic risk,  lifestyle, and personal health history. 75% of women who develop breast cancer have no family history of breast cancer and no risk factors other than being women. A decision about your breast health includes a look at the benefits and limitations of mammograms.

25-39 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

40-49 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

50-74 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

75+ years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

25-39 years of age

Knowledge is power when it comes to your breast health.

Screening for breast cancer is your choice and should be based on your own personal values. It is recommended that you have a discussion with your primary care provider about: your genetic risk,  lifestyle, and personal health history. 75% of women who develop breast cancer have no family history of breast cancer and no risk factors other than being women. A decision about your breast health includes a look at the benefits and limitations of mammograms.

No Family History | No Dense Breasts

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

Yes Family History | Yes Dense Breasts

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

No Family History | Yes Dense Breasts

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

Yes Family History | No Dense Breasts

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

40-49 years of age

Knowledge is power when it comes to your breast health.

Screening for breast cancer is your choice and should be based on your own personal values. It is recommended that you have a discussion with your primary care provider about: your genetic risk,  lifestyle, and personal health history. 75% of women who develop breast cancer have no family history of breast cancer and no risk factors other than being women. A decision about your breast health includes a look at the benefits and limitations of mammograms.

No Family History | No Dense Breasts

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

Yes Family History | Yes Dense Breasts

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

No Family History | Yes Dense Breasts

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

Yes Family History | No Dense Breasts

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

Breast Cancer Screening in British Columbia

Knowledge is power when it comes to your breast health.

Screening for breast cancer is your choice and should be based on your own personal values. It is recommended that you have a discussion with your primary care provider about: your genetic risk,  lifestyle, and personal health history. 75% of women who develop breast cancer have no family history of breast cancer and no risk factors other than being women. A decision about your breast health includes a look at the benefits and limitations of mammograms.

25-39 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

40-49 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

50-74 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

75+ years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

Breast Cancer Screening in British Columbia

Knowledge is power when it comes to your breast health.

Screening for breast cancer is your choice and should be based on your own personal values. It is recommended that you have a discussion with your primary care provider about: your genetic risk,  lifestyle, and personal health history. 75% of women who develop breast cancer have no family history of breast cancer and no risk factors other than being women. A decision about your breast health includes a look at the benefits and limitations of mammograms.

25-39 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

40-49 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

50-74 years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

75+ years of age

When does screening begin?
Provincial breast screening policies differ on the age to start and stop screening. Your screening program may begin at 40 or 50.
Screening for breast cancer is your choice. In some provinces you can self-refer at 40 and in other provinces requisitions are needed.
In British Columbia, the screening program begins at age 40. It is recommended women aged 40-49 have a conversation with their primary care provider about screening.

How often can you book a mammogram?
Women aged 40-49 with no symptoms of breast cancer can book their own mammogram after 18 months by calling 1-800-663-9203

How often should women 40-49 screen?
The most lives are saved by starting screening at age 40 and then going annually for mammograms.

The decision to be screened or not is your choice, based on your values and preferences. (see Benefits and Limitations Chart here.)

Engage in a conversation with your primary care provider about screening. Current evidence shows the benefits of screening mammograms.

Do you have a first-degree male or female relative  with breast cancer?
Should a first degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) develop breast cancer, annual screening is recommended. You can book a mammogram on your own.

Women with a family history of breast cancer are almost two times more likely to develop breast cancer.

Were you informed you have dense breasts?
When you receive a mammogram, your breast density category is included in your mammogram results letter. Breast density is either in one of the 4 categories; A, B, C or D.

If your results indicate that you are in category C or D, then your are considered to have dense breasts. Having dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast cancer and the risk that cancer can be masked on the mammogram. Both cancer and dense tissue appear white creating a camouflage effect.

What further meaaures can women with dense breasts take?
Ultrasound in addition to mammography is recommended by experts. Ultrasound finds additional cancers missed by mammography in dense breasts and finds them when they are small and node negative. It is covered under MSP.  A requisition from your primary care provider is needed.

To learn more about dense breasts and how they impact the importance of screening, visit
BC Cancer Screening

Why breast self-exam is important for women with dense breasts?
Women with dense breasts face an increased risk of an interval cancer, a cancer found as a lump in between screenings.

Benefits
Lives Saved: Research shows that women in their 40s who have mammograms are 44% less likely to die of breast cancer than women who do not (footnote PAN).
Lives Saved: Research shows that women in their 40s who have mammograms are 44% less likely to die of breast cancer than women who do not (footnote PAN).
Lives Saved: Research shows that women in their 40s who have mammograms are 44% less likely to die of breast cancer than women who do not (footnote PAN).
Lives Saved: Research shows that women in their 40s who have mammograms are 44% less likely to die of breast cancer than women who do not (footnote PAN).
Limitations
Missed breast cancer: Mammograms are not perfect. Some cancers cannot be detected on a mammogram due to the location of the cancer or the density of the breast tissue (foot BC Cancer) Mammograms are less effective in younger women because they tend to have denser breast tissue (foot BC cancer).
Mammograms may lead to additional testing: About 9 percent of women will require additional tests to look more closely at a specific area of the breast. This does not mean that cancer is present. Over 95% of the women recall for additional testing do not have cancer.(footnote bc c acer) This may cause short-term anxiety for many women. Studies show that the anxiety does not harm women in the long term.
Low doses of radiation: Mammograms use low doses of radiation. The benefits of regular mammograms outweigh the risks posed by the small amount of radiation you are exposed to.
Over Detection: A woman may end up getting treatment for a cancer that never would have become life threatening even it was untreated.